Protecting Rights. Ending Corporate Abuse

Parent company liability

Cobalt mining, child labour and corporate accountability

In this blog, Joseph Maggs explores the landmark case filed against five tech giants in December 2019 - and the "accountability gap" that leads to companies getting away with child labour in their supply chains.

Mandatory human rights due diligence: an issue whose time has come

In April this year, 25 civil society organisations launched a campaign for a new law to make UK companies more accountable for human rights abuses and environmental abuses in their global operations and supply chains. The good news is that there is growing momentum worldwide for similar legislation.

Victory over Vedanta

In a historic ruling, the UK Supreme Court has allowed 1,826 Zambian villagers to continue to pursue their case (Lungowe v. Vedanta) against UK-based mining giant Vedanta in the UK courts. This blog, by CORE's Policy and Communications Officer, Louise Eldridge, explores the implications of the ruling. It was originally posted by Africa is a Country.

Towards mandatory human rights due diligence in the UK

Several political processes currently underway in the UK offer civil society space to push the Government on mandatory human rights due diligence (mHRDD), writes Marilyn Croser, CORE's Director. This blog was originally published by the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre.

49 global CSOs call for justice for Nigerian villages devastated by Shell oil spill

CORE Coalition and 48 other civil society organisations from around the world are calling on the UK Supreme Court to allow two Nigerian fishing communities to appeal against a ruling that oil giant Shell cannot be held responsible for pipeline spills that devastated their land and livelihoods.

Access to Legal Remedies for Victims of Corporate Human Rights Abuses in Third Countries

Claire Bright, Research Fellow in Business and Human Rights at the British Institute of International and Comparative Law (BIICL) write about the obstacles to justice for victims of corporate human rights abuses, and how they might be overcome.

What does 2019 hold for corporate accountability?

50 people from NGOs, academia and law firms gathered at The Foundry in London on Wednesday 13th February for CORE’s annual partners' meeting. Below is a brief summary of the very wide-ranging expert presentations given on the day.

The Zambian farmers who are suing a mining company in a British court

 In January 2019, a group of Zambian farmers brought their fight for justice to the UK Supreme Court, in a case with far-reaching implications for multinational companies. Louise Eldridge explains the background of the case in a blog originally published by Africa is a Country.

[caption id="attachment_5257" align="alignleft" width="550"] Farmer with his livestock, Zambia. Image credit Felix Clay/Duckrabbit, 2012 via WorldFish Flickr (CC).[/caption]

UK Supreme Court considers whether Vedanta may be held legally responsible for harm caused by Zambian subsidiary

Carlos Lopez, Senior Legal Adviser at the International Commission of Jurists, and Marilyn Croser, Director of CORE, explore the implications of the interlocutory appeal by the company Vedanta Resources and its Zambian subsidiary KCM to the UK Supreme Court. The company is challenging a Court of Appeal decision to uphold jurisdiction of UK courts in the case and allow the plaintiffs, some 1800 Zambian villagers to pursue their case against both companies in the United Kingdom.