Protecting Rights. Ending Corporate Abuse

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Corporate governance reform: what prospects under the new Government?

In their election manifesto, the Conservative Party committed to strengthening the UK’s corporate governance regime. We explore what’s happened to date and look at recent proposals for corporate governance reform.

Cobalt mining, child labour and corporate accountability

In this blog, Joseph Maggs explores the landmark case filed against five tech giants in December 2019 - and the "accountability gap" that leads to companies getting away with child labour in their supply chains.

The Future of the Corporation Programme and Business and Human Rights

In this blog, Dr, Dalia Palombo explains what the 'Future of the Corporation' Programme has in common with business and human rights, including mandatory human rights due diligence.

Mandatory human rights due diligence: an issue whose time has come

In April this year, 25 civil society organisations launched a campaign for a new law to make UK companies more accountable for human rights abuses and environmental abuses in their global operations and supply chains. The good news is that there is growing momentum worldwide for similar legislation.

UK falls short on corporate regulation

Laws to regulate companies’ behaviour are desperately needed – but at the current time, the UK falls short. We explain why the UK needs to move beyond the Modern Slavery Act and also introduce a law that makes companies act to prevent human rights and environmental abuses.

Mixed messages from Supreme Court on parent company liability

This week the UK Supreme Court gave its decisions on Nigerian and Kenyan communities’ requests to appeal in their claims against Shell and Unilever.

Victory over Vedanta

In a historic ruling, the UK Supreme Court has allowed 1,826 Zambian villagers to continue to pursue their case (Lungowe v. Vedanta) against UK-based mining giant Vedanta in the UK courts. This blog, by CORE's Policy and Communications Officer, Louise Eldridge, explores the implications of the ruling. It was originally posted by Africa is a Country.

What does 2019 hold for corporate accountability?

50 people from NGOs, academia and law firms gathered at The Foundry in London on Wednesday 13th February for CORE’s annual partners' meeting. Below is a brief summary of the very wide-ranging expert presentations given on the day.

UK Supreme Court considers whether Vedanta may be held legally responsible for harm caused by Zambian subsidiary

Carlos Lopez, Senior Legal Adviser at the International Commission of Jurists, and Marilyn Croser, Director of CORE, explore the implications of the interlocutory appeal by the company Vedanta Resources and its Zambian subsidiary KCM to the UK Supreme Court. The company is challenging a Court of Appeal decision to uphold jurisdiction of UK courts in the case and allow the plaintiffs, some 1800 Zambian villagers to pursue their case against both companies in the United Kingdom.