Protecting Rights. Ending Corporate Abuse

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Okpabi v Shell and Lungowe v Vedanta Dispel Three Myths

The jurisprudence on the tort law duty of care has established three myths that Okpabi v Shell and Lungowe v Vedanta dispelled.

Joint NGO Briefing: Due Diligence in Schedule 16 of the UK Environment Bill

Schedule 16 in the UK’s Environment Bill seeks to tackle the UK’s contribution to global deforestation. The proposal establishes a legal framework to address the environmental footprint of the UK’s consumption of forest risk commodities by placing a due diligence requirement on companies. Given the prevalence of human rights impacts and risks associated with forest...

A Material Transition

This report examines the potential widespread environmental destruction and human rights abuses unleashed by the extraction of transition minerals – the raw materials needed for the production of renewable energy technologies.

Joint civil society response to the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee report: ‘Uyghur forced labour in Xinjiang and UK value chains.’

Current law and policy – including the Modern Slavery Act – have proved wholly inadequate to both prevent UK companies from contributing to human rights abuses in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, or to compel companies to address human rights abuses in their broader supply chains.

Submission to UNGPs 10+ / Next Decade BHR project

The UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights is undertaking a new project to chart a course for a decade of action on business and human rights - read our submission to the call for inputs.

Debating mandatory Human Rights Due Diligence legislation: A Reality Check

This document aims to counter flawed or inaccurate claims regarding the introduction of mandatory due diligence legislation with liability for companies - and to prevent them from dominating the public and political debate.